philosophy of the religions of ancient Greeks and Israelites
Read Online
Share

philosophy of the religions of ancient Greeks and Israelites

  • 698 Want to read
  • ·
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by University Press of America in Lanham, MD .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Greece

Subjects:

  • Judaism.,
  • Greece -- Religion.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBen Kimpel.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBL782 .K55 1983
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 311 p. ;
Number of Pages311
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3164592M
ISBN 10081913225X, 0819132268
LC Control Number83006512

Download philosophy of the religions of ancient Greeks and Israelites

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Greek Religions. In the centuries before Jesus was born, the number of religions, cults, and forms of philosophy in the Mediterranean world had grown rapidly. The letters of the New Testament provide glimpses of how various religions, philosophies, and . Through his book, the author has set a precedent which should encourage dialogue and cooperative study between all ancient historians and archaeologists, but particularly between Iron Age archaeologists and biblical scholars. The work challenges many conclusions of previous scholarship about the nature of the Israelites' by: This is the most far-reaching interdisciplinary investigation into the religion of ancient Israel ever attempted. The author draws on textual readings, archaeological and historical data and epigraphy to determine what is known about the Israelite religions during the Iron Age ( BCE). The evidence is synthesized within the structure of an Israelite worldview and ethos 5/5(1). by Ben Kimpel Hardcover. $ $ Only 2 left in stock - order soon. A Philosophy of the Religions of Ancient Greeks and Israelites Sep 1, by Ben Kimpel Philosophies of life of the ancient Greeks and Israelites: An analysis of their parallels Jan 1, by Ben Kimpel.

  To our modern concept, there was no 'holy' book for the Greeks. There was public ritual and various writers wrote about gods, described various events involving the gods, etc. But there was no form of 'this is the one true word of The God', as is. Philosophy among the Greeks is believed to have begun in the Ionian city of Miletus, the richest and most powerful Greek city on the coast of Asia Minor. Miletus was on the edge of interacting cultures: Greek, Mesopotamian and Egyptian, and was adjacent to the rich kingdom of Lydia.   The Book of Exodus: ‘ The Israelites Leaving Egypt’ by David Roberts, c. (Public Domain) Moses, according to Atrapanus, was raised as the son of Chenephres, king of Upper of Egypt. Chenephres thought Moses was his own son – but, apparently, the bond between a father and a son wasn’t enough to keep Chenephres from trying to kill him. the beginnings of Western philosophy in ancient Greece ( to BC). Although Greek philosophy, in so far as it approached reality from a rational and abstract point of view, was in many ways at odds with religious-mythic thinking, Greek philosophy did influence the development of Christianity in the first.

At a later date, the ancient Greeks broke with this cosmological consciousness. But they did so in a radically different way. In Greece, philosophy was the method that allowed an elite group of thinkers to move from a cosmological to a revelatory understanding of reality. In the pre-Socratic period, ancient philosophers first articulated questions about the "archḗ" (the cause or first principle) of the n philosophy is generally said to begin in the Greek cities of western Asia Minor, or Ionia, with Thales of Miletus, who was active c. BC and was responsible for the opaque dictum, "all is water.".   Although the religions of the ancient Greeks and Romans are virtually extinct in their original forms, they live on in the cultures, imaginations, and even the religions of the modern western world. In the ancient world, "religion" and "philosophy" were not Adherents: ancient form extinct; various modern revivals.   About The Religions of Ancient Israel. This is the most far-reaching interdisciplinary investigation into the religion of ancient Israel ever attempted. The author draws on textual readings, archaeological and historical data and epigraphy to determine what is known about the Israelite religions during the Iron Age ( BCE).